Chefchaousen. Continued

About a year and a half ago I crossed paths with a young man in Kosovo. He had unfortunately arrived at the hostel on a week when we were full, and he had no reservation.  Fortunately the owner allowed him to sleep on the couch. The following day I told him I had discovered an NGO looking for volunteers and offering to help them find lodgings.  “Shall we go talk to them?” I asked.  We did and, we ended up doing some volunteer hours as well.  He did not get lodging, but instead started helping out at the hostel and stayed after I had left.

During our time together I was able to connect him with people who could help him.  It wasn’t that I knew a bunch of people in Pristina, Kosovo.  It was that I have no trouble introducing myself and asking questions.  At one point about a third of the way through our “relationship” I asked him if he believes in coincidence.  He said “no”.  I asked then,  why he thought these opportunities for paid work, meeting locals who could help him and his showing up at the right time to help the NGO create a video happened.  He replied, “it’s because you talk to EVERYONE!”

So, that’s the secret!

While wandering around Chefchaousen I met more than a dozen people.  Some encounters were brief, some casual like the two American students I shared a lunch table with.  The girl was studying Arabic in Morocco and he was studying in Spain, but they had met at university in the US.

The most interesting there, were a group traveling together who had come to Chefchaousen to volunteer with the charity group RIFCOM based in Gibraltar. All English speakers, but from different places.

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Happily flashing their RIFCOM Logo shirts.
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Caught’cha shopping and taking selfies  😀

This group couldn’t stop talking about RIFCOM and the local project they were joining.  I almost wanted to go with them!  If you are traveling to this part of the world (or even if you’re not) check out the good works of this organisation.  I did!

Later I encountered representatives of a Bedouin weaving co-operative from the southern desert area of Morocco. They naturally would like to sell me a rug, blanket or shawl. It is difficult to convince them that everything in my suitcase is an accumulation of various weights and that the airline’s have limits.  ” But, look, it weighs nothing!” they say.  A bunch of nothing eventually weights something. Lovely, but no thank you.

 

 

I learned a couple of facts: they not only weave wool they also weave natural grasses (vegan rugs); and the men weave rugs, the women weave blankets and wraps.  Lots of weaving going on in this community.

Like music?  This artsy place was where I met two American gals studying in Morocco; and, a Japanese guy studying in mid-west America.  Captured them making music on bongo drums.

Leather tooling is also a major handicraft here as well.

 

Last but far from least are the hospitable people of Chefchaousen who open their doors to thousands of visitors.  Remember, in the previous blog I told you that this community was closed to christians until 1920.

When you visit Morocco, don’t miss this.

I’ll be leaving on a jet plane Tuesday, for Spain, where I’ll be house-sitting for 5 dogs in a town 30 minutes south of Valencia.  Hasta la vista!

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Chefchaousen. Continued

  1. It’s been great getting to know Sherrill here in Berrshid. We have a great deal in common, two women over 70 who are fearless and not afraid to talk to everyone and anyone. Thanks, Sherrill, for this terrific blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great update. Safe travels to Spain

    On Dec 11, 2017 5:29 AM, “Travels With The Red Suitcase” wrote:

    > sherrillmadden posted: “About a year and a half ago I crossed paths with a > young man in Kosovo. He had unfortunately arrived at the hostel on a week > when we were full, and he had no reservation. Fortunately the owner > allowed him to sleep on the couch. The following day I told h” >

    Like

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